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Stats/facts: youth


Tobacco:

How many young Canadians smoke?

Based on a 1990 health survey, of people aged 15 to 24 years old, an estimated 982,300 reported using tobacco at least once during the last year. That is up from 600,000 Canadian students aged 13 to 19 in 1989.

In a 1990 survey, the reported number of daily smokers aged 15 and older was 29 percent and in a 1991 Canadian Gallup survey, 37 percent of people aged 18 to 29 years old, or an estimated 1.9 million young Canadians, reported they had smoked cigarettes in the past week.


Alcohol:

How many young people in Canada drink?

A 1989 Ontario school survey indicated 66.2 percent of high school students used alcohol at least once during the year preceding the survey (an estimated 1.7 million Canadians' teenagers).

A 1990 health survey reported 80 percent of 15-19 year olds and 89 percent of 20-24 years olds were current drinkers.

It also indicated that 9% of street youth across Canada used alcohol on a daily basis in 1989 and by 1992 that number had decreased to 5%.

In a 1987/88 Ontario survey of university students, 94.5 percent reported using alcohol at least once in the past year, with 1 percent using on a daily basis; 45.9 percent of students reported at least one hangover in the past two months, and 18 percent reported nausea and vomiting due to drinking in the past two months.

In 1990 it was estimated that 84.5 percent (over 3 million) of Canadians 15 years+ currently drink alcohol.


How many young people in Canada have drunk driving accidents?

The 1990 health survey reports that in 1990 there was alcohol use involved in 42.7 percent of fatally Injured drivers and 35.4 percent of those had a bac (blood alcohol content) over the legal limit. It also reports that 19 percent of Canadians (3,922,170 people) claimed to have driven after drinking at least once in the previous 30 days.

In Ontario in 1989, of all driver fatalities aged 16 to 25 tested for blood alcohol level (bal), 48 percent had been drinking and 36 percent had a bal more than the legal limit of 0.08 percent.


How many young Canadians contravene alcohol regulations?

In 1989 in Canada, there were 24,711 young offenders charged under provincial liquor acts statutes.


Other drugs:

How many young people in Canada use drugs?

In the 1990 health survey, it was reported that 40 percent (8,257,2000 Canadians) used multiple drugs in various combinations. The drugs included were alcohol, tobacco, cannabis, psychotherapeutic drugs and other combinations.

According to a 1989 Ontario's high school survey, 20.5 percent of students aged 13 to 19 years, or an estimated one-half million teenaged Canadian, had used cannabis or other illicit drugs alone or in combination; 70.8 percent had used at least once, one of the following drugs: alcohol, tobacco, cannabis, inhalants, barbiturates, stimulants, and tranquilizers for medical or non-medical uses, Speed, LSD, PCP, other hallucinogens, cocaine, and heroin. In 1989, of students in grades 11 and 13, 4 percent sold cannabis, and 2 percent sold other drugs.

In 1990, 23 percent (4,510,530 Canadians) reported using one of the following: marijuana or hashish, cocaine, sleeping pills, tranquilizers, pep pills or stimulants.

In 1992 66% of street youths had used cannabis in the previous year, 41% acid, 18% cocaine, 18% speed, 15% solvents, 12% crack, 5% tranquilizers, and 4% "ice". 18% used cannabis on a daily basis, 5% used cocaine daily, 4% used crack, 2% used acid and 1% used speed or tranquilizers.


How many young Canadians use marijuana?

Based on a 1990 health survey, 9 percent (165,780) of 15-19 year olds and 13 percent (256,880) of 20-24 year olds currently smoke marijuana.

A 1989 Ontario survey indicated that 4 percent of high school students in grades 11 and 13 reported selling cannabis. High school students aged 13 to 19 years reported that among cannabis users in these grades, 14 percent sold cannabis.


How many young Canadians use hallucinogens?

Based on a 1989 survey, 5.9 percent of students aged 13 to 19 years, or an estimated 150,000 young Canadians, have used LSD at least once in the Previous year; 1.1 percent or an estimated 30,000 young Canadians, have used PCP, and 4.3 percent, or an estimated 100,000 young Canadians, have used other hallucinogens.

In the 1987/88 Ontario university student survey, 2.6 percent said they had used lsd at least once in the previous year and 7.4 percent reported using other hallucinogens.

In 1990, 41 percent of street youth reported using LSD in the last year; 2 percent said they used acid or LSD on a daily basis.


How many young Canadians use inhalants?

The 1990 health survey reports that 20% of Manitoba native youth and 15% of Quebec native youth tried sniffing solvents. 6% of Manitoba and 9% of Quebec native youth reported continuing use beyond experimentation. The median age for starting to use solvents is 12 years old.

Based on a 1989 Ontario school survey, 1.9 percent of high school students report using glue in the year prior to the survey, or an estimated 50,000 teenaged Canadians; 3.3 percent reported other solvent use, or an estimated 85,000 Canadians.

In 1992 fifteen percent of street youth reported using inhalants in the previous year. Two percent reported daily usage.


How many young people in Canada use cocaine?

Based on a 1990 health survey, 206,430 Canadians, used cocaine at least once in the year before the survey.

In a 1987/88 Ontario university student survey, 4.5 percent of university students reported using cocaine, and 0.3 percent said they used crack at least once in the previous 12 months.

In a 1990 study, 18% of street youths reported using cocaine, and 12% used crack within the Previous year. 5% used cocaine daily and 4% used crack on a daily basis.

In a 1989 Ontario adult survey, 6.1 percent of people aged 18 to 29, or an estimated 300,000 young Canadians, reported using cocaine in the past 12 months before the survey.


How many young Canadians use heroin?

In 1989 in Ontario, 1.2 percent of high school students had used heroin in the 12 months before the survey. Among street youth, 13 percent reported using heroin.

In 1987/88, 0.2 percent of Ontario university students surveyed reported using heroin at least once in the previous 12 months.


How many young Canadians use stimulants?

A 1990 study reports that 1 percent (206,430) of Canadians used stimulants.

Based on a 1989 Ontario survey, 3.3 percent of high school students, or an estimated 85,000 young Canadians, used a stimulant for medical purposes at least once in the previous year, while 6.5 percent or an estimated 170,000 young Canadians used stimulants for non-medical purposes; 2.5 percent or an estimated 65,000 Canadians, used speed.

In 1987/88, 4.9 percent of Ontario university students surveyed reported using stimulants without prescriptions and 1.2 percent with prescriptions; 1.3 percent reported using methamphetamine at least once in the previous year.

In 1992, 18 percent of Canada's street youth reported using speed in the past year; 4 percent said they used "ice" (methamphetamine) in the past year.

One percent reported daily usage of speed and "ice".


How many young people in Canada use tranquilizers?

In 1990 five percent of the Canadian population (1,032,150 people) reported having used tranquilizers within the previous year.

Based on a 1989 Ontario survey, 3.1 percent of high school students aged 13 to 19 years, or an estimated 80,000 teenaged Canadians, used tranquilizers for medical purposes at least once in the previous year; 2.4 percent, or an estimated 60,000 young Canadians, used tranquilizers for non-medical purposes.

In 1992, 5 percent of street youth reported using tranquilizers in the previous year.

In 1989 in Ontario, 5.8 percent of people aged 18 to 29, or an estimated 300,000 Canadians, reported using tranquilizers in the past 12 months.


How many young Canadians have problems due to drugs?

In the 1989 student drug use survey, 1.3 percent of school students said they had been arrested or warned by the police because of their drug use, 0.7 percent said they had seen a physician, and 0.5 percent had received school counselling because of their drug use; one percent had parents who thought they used drugs too often, and 3.3 percent wished they used less drugs. Among cannabis users, 8.8 percent had been arrested or warned by the police, 4.7 percent had seen a physician, 3.4 percent received school counselling, 6.8 percent had parents who thought they used drugs too often, and 22.4 percent wished they used less drugs.

In 1992, 34 percent of street youths had a drug-related arrest, 30 percent had sought help for a drug problem, 22 percent said they had medical problems due to drugs, 21 percent had received medical attention for their drug problem, 35 percent had the desire to use less drugs, and 40 percent were concerned about drug use.


How many young Canadians commit drug crimes?

Information from the uniform crime reporting system maintained by statistics Canada shows That in 1989 in Canada 4,253 young offenders were charged under the narcotic, controlled and restricted drugs acts.

The bureau of dangerous drugs of health and welfare Canada notes that in Canada in 1989 there were 3,170 charges disposed of under the narcotics control act in people less than age 25 years.

The 2,414 convictions under the narcotics control act involved cocaine (2,130), codeine (62), heroin (53), hydrocodone (1), hydromorphine (3), morphine (6), opium (1), oxycodone (7), pentazocine (55), pethidine (1), and phencyclidine (95).

In addition, there were 29 charges disposed of under the food and drug act (part iii--controlled Drugs) for people less than age 25 years. The 14 convictions involved: methamphetamine (1), methylphenidate (12), and phentermine (1).

Finally, there were 894 charges disposed of under the food and drug act (part iv, restricted drugs). These 641 convictions involved the following drugs: LSD (361), MDA (1), and psilocybin (279).

In 1992, drugs played a large part in criminal involvement among street youth: 28% of break and enters, 65% of prostitution, 48% of selling drugs and 51% of robbery or robbery with violence.


How many young people in Canada die of drug- related problems?

In Canada in 1990, 422 people died of drug related deaths: mental disorders (51); poisoning by analgesics, antipyretics and antirheumatics (168); poisoning by sedatives and hypnotics (45); poisoning by psychotropic agents/antidepressants (118); poisoning by psychotropic agents/other (40). There was a total of 365 drug related deaths according to external causes including: accidental poisonings (144); suicide and self-inflicted injury poisonings (190); and injury undetermined poisonings (31).